Posted by: Patricia Becker | July 18, 2014

Edible Landscaping Tour

Common Ground’s 8th Annual Edible Landscaping Tour

Saturday, July 19th, 2014   10am-4pm

  • Explore local organically-grown edible gardens2014-07-16 19.08.37
  • Learn about Grow Biointensive & organic gardening practices
  • Meet the creative gardeners & get great ideas
  • Bicycle Friendly

Tour Highlights: Water Saving Techniques, Fruit Trees, Raised Beds & Berries, Chickens & Coops, Greenhouses, Herb, Flower & Native Plantings, Composting, and Lots of Vegetables!    Check out the Palo Alto Weekly article

Read the garden descriptions before you prick up the map Saturday Morning.  Garden Descriptions

Click Here to Register

Posted by: Patricia Becker | July 7, 2014

4 Summer Time Health Tips

Cool off this summer with yoga, meditation and breathing techniques. Stay focused, healthy and happy with some simple practices.

4 Yoga Tips to Cool Off This Summer

One season flows into another – each one brings its set of changes. A yogi will simply look at the changes and act accordingly. Here are some best practices and tips to ensure the body and mind stay fit.

You could choose a favorite yoga tip and practice it regularly or even do all.

#1: The secret is in your breath

The next time you have a few minutes before you rush out for the day, try the body cooling pranayama.
1. Stick your tongue out and curl the sides of the tongue upward towards the center of the tongue.

2. Breathe in through the mouth, hold the breath and slowly exhale through the nose.

Repeat five to 10 times.

#2: Drink up

The more you hydrate yourself, the better. With 70 percent of water in your body, you’d better ensure there’s lot of liquid out there.

Besides drinking extra fluids, you could include the alternative nostril breathing  in your routine. Here’s how:

1. Close the right nostril with your right thumb.

2. Exhale completely through the left nostril and then breathe in through the left nostril.

3. Close the left nostril with your little ring finger and exhale through the right.

Repeat five to 10 times.

#3: Slow down on yoga poses

Yoga poses practiced gently and meditatively balance the mind and body and are beneficial at any time of the year.

Strenuous physical activity or yoga increases body temperature, best to avoid in summer and save for cooler months. Early in the morning or late in the evening are the best times to practice yoga postures during summer.

#4 Watch what you Consume

Reduce intake of spicy food, tea, coffee and sugar.MFM_FinalLogo_CMYK1

Avoid fatty food because it puts extra burden on the digestive system and heart.

Consume larger quantities of fruits, raw and cooked vegetables

Minimize consumption of non-vegetarian food.

Increase your intake of water add a option squeeze of lemon or lime with a pinch of salt.

Last but not least;

After a long day, do you want to unwind in the evening? Lie down near a wall – with your legs and feet up the wall in a comfortable manner.  Stay  for a 2 or 3 minutes.  Bring the legs down and rest in Shavasana.  These yoga poses are refreshing and restorative. How does this work? Since the heart is pumping out more blood, when the temperature is high, this yoga pose helps the heart by returning more blood back to the heart. (use gravity to bring the blood back to the heart.)

Posted by: Patricia Becker | July 2, 2014

8th Annual Edible Landscaping Tour

COMMON GROUND’S  8th ANNUAL EDIBLE LANDSCAPING TOUR

Saturday, July 19th, 2014  10am-4pm

Eigth Annual Edible Tour$35, proceeds benefit Common Ground, a 501c3 nonprofit project of Ecology Action.

Register Now

Organic Food Grown in our Neighborhoods!

  • Explore local organically-grown edible gardens
  • Learn about Grow Biointensive & organic gardening practices
  • Meet the creative gardeners & get great ideas
  • Bicycle Friendly

Tour Highlights: Water Saving Techniques, Fruit Trees, Raised Beds & Berries, Chickens & Coops, Greenhouses, Herb, Flower & Native Plantings, Composting, and Lots of Vegetables!

This year the Edible Landscaping Tour is featuring several front yard edible gardens!  Gone are the days when vegetable gardens were considered unsightly and relegated to the back yard only. Come see the variety of these gardens which demonstrate that growing food is not just practical, but beautiful!

Posted by: Patricia Becker | June 23, 2014

Trika Tirka Trika

noahs-fb-cover-may-20141.jpg

Good Times with Noah Maze in San Fransisco May 2014

Posted by: Patricia Becker | June 15, 2014

50 Ways to use Coconut Oil

Scientific research on coconut oil has revealed health benefits that affect your entire body, inside and out.

You’ve heard good things about it and now you have a tub of it sitting in your pantry. So how do you use coconut oil?   coconut oil

1) Cooking at High Heat – Some oils are unsafe to cook with at high temperatures, coconut oil is a great alternative. Check out our Guide to Cooking Oils to find the healthiest cooking oils for whatever meal you are creating.

2) On Toast Instead of Butter – Simply use coconut oil instead of butter on your toast.

3) Eat it by the Spoonful - Coconut oil is that delicious and healthful. Enjoy one spoonful each morning.

4) Smoothies - Add one tablespoon of coconut oil into your favorite smoothie recipe and increase your energy with the oil’s MCTs. Check out this post for the Top Smoothie Ingredients.

5) Fry Eggs – Lightly coat the bottom of your skillet with coconut oil to create a non-stick surface and delicious eggs.

6) Popping Popcorn – A sweet twist on a classic snack! To make stovetop popcorn, you need a heavy-bottomed pan. First, add the coconut oil and popcorn to the pot. Coat the area of the pot with the oil, and use just enough popcorn to make a single layer over the bottom of the pot. Give the pot a little shake to make sure all of the kernels are coated with oil. Next, place the pot over medium heat. Put the lid on the pot, leaving it slightly open so that steam can escape. It should take about five minutes for the popcorn to pop completely.

7) Popcorn Topping – Instead of butter, melt a little coconut oil and pour it over your popped popcorn. Then sprinkle lightly with Himalayan crystal salt.

8) Oven Baked Sweet Potato Chips - Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Thinly slice sweet potatoes to about 1/8” thick. Place slices on a baking sheet and brush lightly with coconut oil. Bake for about 15 minutes or until chips are lightly brown. Add salt to taste, and serve with salsa or dip. (Or just eat them plain – either way they’re delicious!)

9) Replace Vegetable Oil for Baking – Next time you make your favorite brownie recipe, replace the vegetable oil with coconut oil. Your friends will be begging you for the recipe.

10) Pan Frying – Next time you fry up a batch of sweet potato fries or a piece of chicken, use coconut oil.

11) Grilled Cheese with Coconut Oil – No need for butter the next time you are making a grilled cheese sandwich.

12) Coconut Oil Coffee – Adding a spoonful to your coffee is a delicious way to start your day with a huge energy boost! Here is a great recipe for coconut oil coffee.

13) Homemade Granola – Check out this delicious recipe for coconut granola.

14) A Spoonful in Tea – Allow some coconut oil to melt and mildly flavor your next cup of tea.

15) Salad Dressings – A simple recipe for a salad dressing with coconut oil can be found here.

Click Here more ways at Natural Cures Not Medicine

Posted by: Patricia Becker | May 30, 2014

Beginning Yoga: Barriers of Entry

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

We’ve all had this moment…

Meditation is also hard. Have you ever tried to sit still and find mental and emotional clarity and stillness? “My back hurts…I’m hungry…we are out of milk…” Sound familiar?

Yoga culture itself can be strange. Do you need tight and bright exercise clothing? Do you need to talk in new-agey self-help slogans? Do you need to wear beads around your neck and your wrists? Do you need to have an OM sticker on your car, or tattooed on your body?

According to the 2012 study “Yoga in America:”

  • 20.4 million Americans currently participate in yoga
  • Almost 105 million Americans are interested but have so far not participated, or have participated in the past, and would like to start again.

And yet, the benefits are many:

On its most surface level, yoga is a challenging and fun discipline that keeps the body fit.Noah in Mountain-Pose-1-e1401397539434
It regulates the internal organs and balances the circulatory, respiratory, and hormonal systems.

Yoga alleviates stress, aids in the healing of physical injuries and illnesses.

Yoga helps us to reclaim our general sense of well-being; physically, emotionally, and spiritual.

What are your barriers of entry? Or, what were your barriers of entry?

For more information on YOGAMAZÉ101: 40 Days of Yoga to Change Your Life, or to register for the course, go to: http://yogamaze.net/yoga-101-practice/

editation is also hard. Have you ever tried to sit still and find mental and emotional clarity and stillness? “My back hurts…I’m hungry…we are out of milk…” Sound familiar?

Yoga culture itself can be strange. Do you need tight and bright exercise clothing? Do you need to talk in new-agey self-help slogans? Do you need to wear beads around your neck and your wrists? Do you need to have an OM sticker on your car, or tattooed on your body?

According to the 2012 study “Yoga in America:”

  • 20.4 million Americans currently participate in yoga
  • Almost 105 million Americans are interested but have so far not participated, or have participated in the past, and would like to start again.

And yet, the benefits are many:

On its most surface level, yoga is a challenging and fun discipline that keeps the body fit.
It regulates the internal organs and balances the circulatory, respiratory, and hormonal systems.

Yoga alleviates stress, aids in the healing of physical injuries and illnesses.

Yoga helps us to reclaim our general sense of well-being; physically, emotionally, and spiritual.

What are your barriers of entry? Or, what were your barriers of entry?

- See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

- See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

- See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

- See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

- See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

- See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

Posted by: Patricia Becker | May 26, 2014

Trika with Noah May 25, 2014 Yoga Tree MissionTrika with Noah May 25, 2014 close up Yoga Tree Mission   Having fun with Noah Maze Yoga Teacher Training in San  May 25, 2014 Francisco

Trikonasana, Trikonasana, Trikonasana…..!

Trikonasana is usually performed in two parts, facing left, and then facing right. The practitioner begins standing with the feet one leg-length apart, knees unbent, turns the right foot completely to the outside and the left foot less than 45 degrees to the inside, keeping the heels in line with the hips. The arms are spread out to the sides, parallel to the ground, palms facing down; the trunk is extended as far as is comfortable to the right, while the arms remain parallel to the floor. Once the trunk is fully extended to the right, the right arm is dropped so that the right hand reaches the shin (or a block or on the floor) to the front (left side) of the right foot, with the palm down if flexed. The left arm is extended vertically, and the spine and trunk are gently twisted counterclockwise (i.e., upwards to the left, since they’re roughly parallel to the floor), using the extended arms as a lever, while the spine remains parallel to the ground. The arms are stretched away from one another, and the head is often turned to gaze at the left thumb, slightly intensifying the spinal twist. Returning to standing, the bend is then repeated to the left.

Posted by: Patricia Becker | May 16, 2014

Pleasure

Milk every moment for all the pleasure you can get from it. When you say, “It is my dominant intent to look for things that feel good today. No matter where I’m going, no matter what I’m doing, no matter who I’m doing it with, it is my dominant intent to look for what I’m wanting to see, to look for things that feel good,” and the more you develop the habit of that kind of vibration—the more the Universe understands that that’s who you are! And so, the more you have access only to those kinds of things!

—Abraham

Posted by: Patricia Becker | April 19, 2014

Yoga for a Healthy Back

Yoga for a Healthy Back

Common Ground Garden Supply and Education Center  559 College Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306
Saturday, May 24
10:30 – 12:30 $31 Click to Register

Gardeners and high-tech computer people alike want to take care of their backs to live a full happy life. Learn the best practices and methods for keeping your back muscles healthy. Learn thigh stretches and strengthening yoga poses for your thighs to improve your back. Good alignment in your legs translates to your back. Get empowered to help you and your back feel better. Even if it is good now, let’s keep it that way! Taught by Patricia Becker who is the Common Ground Center Manager and has been teaching Yoga for Healthy back class- In Twist, Juice it Up!yoga classes locally and at Stanford University.

 

Posted by: Patricia Becker | February 10, 2014

Celebrating 2014, The Year of the Horse

Patricia Becker:

Thank You MacroChef
Your fans at Feel Better Now

Originally posted on the MacroChef:

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———–

Is it too late to wish you a happy new year?  Not if you follow the Chinese calendar which ushers in the Year of the Horse today or tomorrow, depending on where in the world you are. For most of us, it’s been a new year since January 1st and as usual I began my year with an open house. I’ve been holding an open house on New Year’s Day for so many years, I can’t remember a time when I didn’t.  It must be 20 years, at least. And every year I ask myself  “Do you really want to do this or are you doing it only because you’ve always done it?”  So far, I’ve always concluded that I really want to do it. Even for me, a professional cook, it’s a lot of work. Perhaps I should say, especially for me as a professional cook, it is a lot…

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